Ice Vending Machine Business: Read Before You Invest

Would you like to run your own business? Have you considered running an ice vending machine business? In this post I will take you through exactly what you need to know to get started as an ice vending machine business owner in the United States.

What is an ice vending machine business?

It is basically a passive income generator. You purchase a number of machines and have them in various high-traffic locations such as convenience stores. Then the vending machines make money as they are used by customers. The machines dispense quality ice, and you make a profit. With only a small investment, an ice vending machine business is a great way to develop a source of passive income that you can scale. In that sense, many entrepreneurs see it as a good investment.

Why own an ice vending machine business?

There are a number of reasons, but I can break it down into the following four:

  • It’s efficient. As a business owner, you won’t face many of the efficiency issues other busiensses have. You won’t need to hire staff, for example. There is also no need for inventory tracking either. These aspects are built in to the business and it’s operations.
  • Low startup costs. Sure, you can’t start your own ice machine business for free, but you can expect reasonable prices as well as a sensible initial investment. It’s also often the case that there is flexibility around financing. It can be one of the more lucrative additions to your business portfolio
  • It’s steady. Unlike many things in life when it comes to business, people will always need ice. Even if it’s just for an ice cube or two for a drink. And ice sales are constant during economic downturns.
  • It’s almost ‘hands-off’. You will have to be part of your vending business to a certain degree, but you won’t have to be anywhere near your machines. Some machines even allow you to check them remotely as they work in retail locations such as convenience stores

What’s the cost of an ice vending machine?

They are not as costly as you might think. Ice House America is one of the leading brands for ice machines and it says that you can generally expect prices for a machine to range from $43,000 to $150,000. For a business that could eventually bring considerable passive income, that isn’t too much money. And if you’re concerned about buying the unit and repairs etc. the machines usually come with a full manufacturer’s warranty for a year.

There are some machines out there that can cost as little as $20,000. However, you will need to be careful here. The price range quoted in the previous paragraph can offer a machine with a long life. If you buy one for $20,000 you may find out it needs a lot of repair and maintenance within just a couple of years. These repair costs could cost you a lot of money in the long-term.

They’re pretty tough too, with ice vending machines expected to last up to 20 years. This means you don’t have to worry about purchasing a new vending machine a couple of years down the track.

The type of business you run is dependent on what you want and what the vendor can offer. For example, some companies offer only a franchise model, where you have to pay a portion of your profits to them alongside franchise fees. Others will sell you the machine outright. The reason why someone might go for the franchise model is that there is generally more help from the vendor on setting up and so on. But buying outright means you get to keep all the profits.

Want to start your very own vending machine business?

Why not learn from the experts at iKrave Vending.

Featured in Business Insider and CNBC.

Placement

Then you have to think about placement. High traffic locations are absolutely crucial to this type of business. The perfect location is generally one that has plenty of potential customers. These tend to be office buildings for example, but some of the best locations include a gas station or inside convenience stores. Believe it or not, some companies are happy for you to place one on their premises for zero cost. Others will charge and you will need to shop around for the best deal for you.

It is a good idea to make sure the vending machine you choose accepts only remote payments. That way, you’re able to streamline your business. In terms of credit card payments, you will incur minimal ongoing costs. Nevertheless, it is only a minimal cost, which saves you from having to visit your machine on a frequent basis.

Maintenance is one of your biggest ongoing costs. Equipment breaks down occasionally. It is therefore critical that you have a maintenance company at hand. There are companies that specialize in this kind of maintenance. You don’t want to leave your machine for too long without repairs. Check on your machines regularly to minimize repair costs. Contact your maintenance person as soon as possible when something goes wrong. Even if it is something as simple as a water dispenser problem, if you don’t alert maintenance experts quickly, it will cost you money.

While we’re on the subject of maintenance…

How to maintain your ice vending machine

Like most appliances and machines, you can do a lot of the maintenance work yourself just by looking after the units.

Since they don’t need to be restocked regularly, ice vending machines require less upkeep than most vending machines. If you keep an organized schedule and plan in place, your machine will be in perfect working condition and your customers will be satisfied, while consuming the least amount of time and energy.

Keep a detailed maintenance schedule

Stay organized if you want your vending machine maintenance to stay on track. Maintaining a written plan that outlines the steps you need to take and when they need to be taken is a good way to keep from getting behind. Keep a spreadsheet on your computer or on your phone, or a schedule in your office. The schedule should include:

  • Clean surfaces, remove dirt and mud, empty trash cans, disinfect surfaces.
  • Clean ice maker, augers, and add salt each month.
  • Clean machine floors, aerate freezers, and sanitize water dispensers as needed

Plan for water contamination events and monitor them

A local water supply supplies water to your ice and water vending machines. As a result, you will need to watch for water advisories if you have ice vending machines installed anywhere. If the water supply in your area is contaminated or water advisories are issued, you’ll need to take additional cleaning measures. 

Prepare a water advisory maintenance plan that includes:

  • Clean the applicator, the container, the bin, and the auger
  • Remove the sediment and dechlorinator filters
  • Place towels on the machine floor to keep the floor clean while you are performing maintenance, or sanitize the floor afterward

Maintaining and repairing the lot

Improve the appearance of your vending machine to encourage customers to visit it. Adding maintenance steps such as light bulb replacements or surface repairs might be necessary if you own the lot. The land owner may need to be consulted about repairs if you don’t own the lot.

Learn how to start your own vending machine business with under $3000 in capital.

Head on over to iKrave Vending for the full story.

How much will my ice vending machine business make?

Obviously, you’ll have to work hard and make sure you actively run the business, but the industry can be one that brings considerable income. If you go with the average price points and the expected sales volume in the industry, you can look forward to a net income of around $3,600 per month. Average costs for the month are around $230.

Everest Ice and Water Systems is an INC Top 5000 company and provides a very useful profit calculator on it’s website. Take a look at the calculator here for a realistic idea of your income prospects with ice machines.

A bag of ice is not a huge business cost. Each 100 pounds of ice typically costs $0.25 in water and electricity.

Therefore, a bag of ice weighing 20 pounds might cost as little as $0.05 in utilities. Some people bring coolers, but for those who use bags, they will each cost around $0.10.

This means the variable cost of a 20 pound bag of ice is just under $0.15. If the bag is sold for $1.75, your variable profit is $1.60.

  • A $35,000 machine has a life of 10 years, so it costs around $300 a month.
  • Assume your rent is $300 per month. At $1.60 per bag profit, you would need to sell 375 bags per month to break even.
  • Each day, this amounts to about 12 or 13 bags. Naturally, you’d rather do more than break even, you’d like to make a profit.
  • It is therefore critical that you find a site that attracts 30 customers or more per day

Renting a site

You will likely have to spend some money to rent a site that attracts 30 or more customers per day.

In some areas, it could cost as much as $500 per month.

Gas stations and convenience stores both cater to the same types of customers, so the first place to start is there.

At least 10,000 cars per day is probably a good target.

Furthermore, there should be easy access to the ice machine, good ingress and egress, and road accessibility alongside parking blocks.

With $300 per month in capital costs (machine and site work) and $300 per month in rent, multiplied by an additional $100 per machine per month in licenses, maintenance, repairs, and other costs, the break even point is approximately 14 to 15 bags per day.

If 50 bags were sold per day, a machine would produce about $1700 per month in profit.

How much energy does a machine use?

With environmental concerns now a priority, as well as financial concerns, it’s important to be aware of how much energy your machine will use.

Here is a handy calculator I found online that will give you the full picture on the typical rate of ice maker energy use.

Next steps

To get started with your ice vending machine business take the following steps:

Set up your business by choosing a name and arranging for a logo to be created. The logo is quite easy to take care of. You can head to any freelance websites like Fiverr and get a designer to do it for you there. It won’t hit your bank account hard and will enable you to start branding your business.

Then create a website for your business. Again, this is not expensive, and you can even set up free websites via Google and WordPress. Don’t worry too much about making the site perfect, it’s more about making sure that you have a presence online. Getting your vending machine business listed on Google is also important. Do this by creating a Google My Business listing. You can then be found by people looking for vending services in your area.

Then establish an LLC, corporation, or any other business entity you intend to use for your business. An attorney can help you with your business entity formation, or you can use online resources that can help you do this yourself.

Then, head on over to:

Ice House America

The Ice Depot

Bag of Ice

These are great places to start with setting up your own ice vending machine business.

Want to learn about another opportunity? Take a look at my extensive guide to Quiznos franchises. Or how about my guide to can vending machines?

Too much to think about? Try Todoist to get your life (and ice) in order.

Personal Branding For Shy People

Let’s say that, about a year ago, you started your own little company. Let’s say that company quickly started to bring in some money, and you’re now standing on the verge of making some real revenue.

But there’s a problem.

You don’t ‘do’ personal branding. You hear a lot about personal branding, and the fact it demands all of that self-marketing stuff like networking and public speaking and it makes your flesh crawl. There is nothing wrong with networking and public speaking, but you just can’t bring yourself to do it.

It’s just not you.

If that’s what personal branding means, they can keep it. It’s for the birds.

But what if there is more to personal branding?

What if there is other stuff you can do, stuff that builds your personal brand without dragging you kicking and screaming out of your nice, cuddly comfort zone?

There are other things you can do, other techniques, actions and strategies that you can employ, all of which can help you build a brand that people engage with. And for the majority of these (those we will focus on in this post) you don’t even have to leave the house.

But first, I need to offer you a big and ugly caveat.

You can’t run away from personal branding

It needs to happen if you are a small to medium-sized company. You don’t have millions to spend on advertising and PR, so you have to develop your own brand, one that is about you, and one that is so damn exciting people want to talk to you and buy from you.

Unfortunately, that means that somewhere in the near future, you will have to exit that little comfort zone of yours. And that’s a by-product of success.

The more you use the following methods to build up a personal brand, the more urgent it will become that you have to start getting out there and talking to people. By all means, be introverted, but don’t expect to really hit the big time unless you have a face behind the following tried and tested ‘introverted’ personal branding techniques.

Got that? Good. Now, let’s get on with the personal branding techniques you can use if you don’t want to turn up to the party (yet).

Blogging

This is more important than ever. Blogging allows you to express yourself. That’s why the blog was invented. And there is still no better way to build up a body of work that builds up a brand. You can do it behind closed doors too, so you don’t have to show up to the party. Instead, you can brand yourself from your room or office, without having to get out there and meet people. That is a real possibility, and it is what a lot of people do.

Some graduate from this approach. Take Chris Brogan. The guy was writing blogs for years and then he started to be read, and people began to respect what he was writing about. He now shows up to the party every week, with public speaking and other appearances, including quite a few expert panels.

So blogging is perfect for that kind of personal branding that keeps the party from your door. Just be ready to show up to that party if you get to be any good at blogging.

Social Media

This is another way in which you can legitimise yourself and build that brand. You can create an entire business empire on social media (many have) and that is because it’s like bringing the party to your computer. Every minute of the day if you like.

Create value, communicate with others (in a grown-up away) and you’ll soon see social paying off for you. Beware though; it also carries the Chris Brogan effect.

Learning

One of the best ways to build a brand quietly and without your party dress on is through learning. The more you learn about your industry and the more you can pass that learning on to the people who read you and follow you, the better and bigger your brand will become.

So spend some of that alone time learning. Read other blogs, join forums (you can post on forums in your pyjamas, don’t worry) and generally become that expert that a good brand is built upon.


When it comes to personal branding, you don’t have to be at the party all day, every day. You don’t even have to leave the house. But remember that doing it alone is only the start of things, and sooner or later you will need to get your dancing shoes on, grab a cocktail, and network baby, network.

Tumbleweeds In Your Content Marketing?

Content marketing for your business can be a desperate thing during those early days. You can work your socks off cranking out post after post for months and find that only your mother and her friend have read them (or have pretended to).

You can tweet like you mean it for aeons and get nowhere. And you can literally waste a significant portion of your life on other platforms.

What if no one is reading your content? What can you do about a problem that is both frustrating and, frankly, quite embarrassing? We’re not talking about engagement here, as in comments and likes and so on. We’re talking about something really bad. Tumbleweed bad.

We’re talking about people not even viewing your content. No views, no traffic, nothing. Just a tumbleweed or two, and plenty of blood, sweat and tears.

So how do you get rid of those tumbleweeds? What can you possibly do to ensure that people come see what you do, before it’s too late?

Keep cranking out your stuff

This is the best advice I can give and possibly the worst to hear. Whatever you do and whatever you create content on, someone needs to know about it. But this kind of stuff does take time. I have had many, many clients who start to become impatient after they get no engagement even at the three-month stage. Sometimes they give up, only to find that if they had waited just a few days longer people would start to connect with their content. It happens.

Don’t ever give up. Set a routine where you create content on a daily basis. You can mix it up if you like. Create one video post a week, and three blog posts. Add daily social media content and leave it at that for a while. Test and see the response. If it isn’t working after three months, change it. I’m not going to mention Rome and how it was built but you get the picture.

Keep it relevant

This is especially crucial. When those readers eventually come calling they will be expecting relevant content. Prepare for this.

Find out what people in your industry are talking about right now, and then create content around that. The more you do this, the more your content will be seen as relevant and important. Keep the news and industry items dynamic and it will pay off in the long run.

Write more

I know the general industry consensus is now about writing amazing pieces that you would expect to be read in ten years time but that is not always the best approach. And it is really bad if all you’re seeing is tumbleweeds.

You need volume, and sometimes it is good to write 10-20 good pieces over a couple of weeks and get them out there, rather than just 5 stellar pieces. Get noticed first, and then get appreciated.

So, keep going. Keep it relevant and write as much as you can. Soon, that tumbleweed will be swept up in a storm of critical approval and appreciation.

And the best thing is, you’ll deserve it.

And for God’s sake, if you’re getting no comments, turn the comments feature off.

It’s Not The Content Marketing, It’s You

Recently, I’ve had many clients come to me and express concern over content marketing and the return on investment it will bring to them. These concerns range from the issue of having any return on investment at all; to how much money they’re going to get, right down to the last penny.

As this conversation is now a common one, my answer is becoming clearer and clearer:

Your company will only get a return on investment that is directly proportionate to the amount of effort put in.

If that sounds a little casual, I apologise.

It’s still true. The more work you put into the content, the better the results. So a client who comes to me and wants five blog posts over two months and expects 200 new subscribers by the third month is severely misguided. And so is the client who thinks she will get a good amount of traffic if she only ever posts once a week (she will, but it will take a lot of weeks).

The Internet is no longer the fun and exciting place it used to be. Instead, it’s monopolised and exploited. It is no longer a new frontier that anyone can claim with a little bit of hard work. If you want to have any impact at all with your content marketing, meaning traffic and return on investment, you need a full campaign that projects months and even years ahead.

What great content won’t do for you

You could have the best content in the world, but it will never, ever do any of the following things for you.

It won’t compensate for low frequency

If I wrote like Ernest Hemingway once a month for twelve months I still wouldn’t get a single iota of interest on my traffic. That’s because Google and everyone else who is involved in your traffic is only ever looking for volume.

No one would ever visit Disneyworld if it had just one ride.

The answer? Post often, and publish often

It won’t disguise the fact you don’t have a strategy

Some great pieces that are not connected, but are instead just random collections of thoughts vaguely linked to your industry, will not establish your presence or build engagement.

The answer? Settle on a theme or two, and then hammer those themes with good content.

It won’t bring you a sale the first time you do it (or the first five times)

This is a killer for most companies. They are convinced that a few good pieces of content will secure a sale, and bring that famous ROI. This doesn’t happen. We are talking about a series of high quality posts that are marketed well, not a few good posts.

It’s not the content marketing, it’s you

The fact is that anyone can write. Seriously, anyone can. But can your company write and add value in the long term? If it can’t, don’t bother with content marketing. It will never work for you.

Never.

What Is A Limited Company?

If you are self-employed, you have the option to set yourself up as a limited company.  

A limited company is an organisation that you set up to run a business. Like being a sole trader, you can set up the business so that you work alone, and run the business alone as a solo entrepreneur. The difference between being a sole trader and having a limited company is that the finances of a limited company are separate to your finances, and the responsibility for the business lies with the limited company. The company owns any profit it makes, and after paying Corporation Tax, can then share those profits out among the people who run the company. Of course,if it is just you who runs the company, you take note profits.

Who owns a limited company?

The easy and straightforward answer is that a limited company is owned by it’s members. This means that if you are the only member, you own the company in it’s entirety. From selling your products to managing the business and beyond, ownership and responsibility is with you. If you have set up the company with other people however, ownership is shared between all of you.

A limited company needs a director to ensure that the company is run well and run according to regulations. If you are the owner of the company and the sole person, you are the director. If there are more people involved in ownership, a decision will have to be made as to who the director is.

Being a director carries significant responsbility outside of making sure the company is run well. The director must maintain company records and report to HMRC( HM Revenue and Customs). This means keeping HMRC up to date with changes and registering a tax return every year.

As a limited company, you will pay Corporation Tax (otherwise known as ‘business tax’). This means taxable profits, including money raised from trading, investments and the sale of any assets. If you do not set up your limited company for paying Corporation Tax within three months of setting up for business, you could face a fine from HMRC.

If you have been a sole trader, you will be used to receiving a bill from HMRC informing you of tax you have to pay. This does not happen with a limited company. You fill out a company tax return and work out how much you are liable for with your taxable profits.

If you are the director, this is your job. You can hire an accountant obviously, but responsibility lies with you and only you.

This is a basic explanation of what a limited company is. Bear in mind the key takeaways here. You can own and run a limited company yourself, but all responsibility lies with you. reporting for tax with HMRC is again your job. If other people are involved a director must be appointed. That director has sole responsibility for the oversight of the company as well as dealings with HMRC.

Next, we will look at how to set up a limited company so that it meets legal requirements.

The 3 Biggest Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make

This post previously appeared on insiginiaseo.com.

We all know it’s not easy being an entrepreneur. The hours are long and the pay (at least until you’re in real profit territory) is measly. However, as long as you don’t make silly mistakes and you enter every situation with a keen and focused mind, you will get there. If you don’t know what mistakes you’re trying to avoid, you’re in serious trouble. Forewarned is forearmed, after all. Take a look at the following and make a note of these bumps in the road. They could be the difference between a thriving business and another statistic.

1.) Not Networking

Before we get into this one, remember that networking doesn’t mean just attending huge events where business cards are thrown around like confetti. Networking is something that you can do over the phone, or at a chance meeting with a potential prospect.

Networking helps keep your venture visible, and it gives people a feel for who you are and why they should do business with you. So wherever you are in the first few years of your business, you should be visible and talking about the business and how it helps people. If you’re not comfortable with introducing yourself to people and making serious small talk, find a partner who is. Business is about networking. You need to do it.

2.) Being Unreliable

This seems like the most obvious thing in the world to get right, but so many entrepreneurs make a mistake in this area, especially in the early days of a business when pressure can be at its worst. Your customers and clients are the most important people in the world. And that’s that.

If there is even the smallest chance that you may not be able to fulfill an order, don’t take the order. If you can’t make a client meeting, send someone else. And if you are overwhelmed, slow down.

Ask anyone who’s dealt with entrepreneurs before what the worst part of it is and they’ll tell you that an entrepreneur who can’t keep her word is a pain in the neck. And if a client feels let down, they’ll tell everyone they know about it. That’s a great way to make a business fail. Your word is your bond. Clients expect to use someone who is reliable.

3.) Listening to everyone

Every successful entrepreneur will tell you about the time they listened to bad advice. There will be a number of people who are trying to pass on advice to you if you’re just starting out. Some of it will be useful, but a lot of it will be detrimental and will affect your progress.

Most people mean well, and many will have ‘been around the block’, but if it feels like the advice just doesn’t ring true for you, ignore it. The best piece of advice you will ever get from anyone when it comes to being an entrepreneur is to‘follow your instincts’. Using instinct is what gets you to the top.

Think about the above three areas and see if you can keep them in mind if you are faced with a problem or a ‘crossroads’ in business. And remember that being an entrepreneur only gets easy when you’ve been doing it for a while. Until then, you need to be careful, have integrity, and be willing to network.

Content Marketing And The Golden Ratio

The original Golden Ratio has nothing to do with content marketing of course. In fact, it’s a very complex and mind-boggling mathematical concept (it features pretty heavily in the arts too). But the idea of a golden or ideal ratio in your content marketing does make sense.

At the extreme and negative end of the spectrum, content marketers just churn out pieces of content that are full of calls to action. This is wrong. In your content marketing, if readers and viewers are constantly being asked to find out more about (or to buy) your product or service they will give up before too long.

At the same time, and at the other end of the spectrum, there are some content marketers who are almost afraid to offer calls to action. This is when the content marketer thinks that their main aim is to just offer expertise and insight and then wait for the leads to flood in. This again is wrong.

There is a balance that can be struck. And that’s where the idea of a Golden Ratio comes in. Get the ratio right, the theory goes, and you should have a consistent stream of leads due to a perfect mix of insight and marketing.

How it works

Let us say that you create six pieces of content during the week. When I say content I mean written posts, as well as infographics, videos and so on. Content marketing can mean any of these things, and variety is important.

Of those six pieces, four of them should be curated. This means you have searched and found interesting content that is relevant to your audience and their needs. It means you are providing value to your audience.

Just one of the pieces of content you create should be entirely created by you. This is the expertise part, and if it is done well, it will complement the four pieces of content you have curated.

The final piece of content should be completely sales related. This could be a press release about your company, or a sales letter, or a presentation. It could be a video about your product perhaps.

Why does this work? You’re pushing out leadership, through curated content and the content you have created yourself, but at the same time you’re also injecting a bit of sales into the mix. It’s the right balance, and it’s the Golden Ratio.

So that’s four pieces of curated content, one piece you made yourself, and one sales piece. That works out at 4:1:1 as a ratio. As a Golden Ratio, that is.

Scale it up by all means, but keep that Golden Ratio in mind, and you’ll soon gain content marketing traction.

The Golden Ratio and content marketing

The original Golden Ratio has nothing to do with content marketing of course. In fact, it’s a very complex and mind-boggling mathematical concept (it features pretty heavily in the arts too). But the idea of a golden or ideal ratio in your content marketing does make sense.

At the extreme and negative end of the spectrum, content marketers just churn out pieces of content that are full of calls to action. This is wrong. In your content marketing, if readers and viewers are constantly being asked to find out more about (or to buy) your product or service they will give up before too long.

At the same time, and at the other end of the spectrum, there are some content marketers who are almost afraid to offer calls to action. This is when the content marketer thinks that their main aim is to just offer expertise and insight and then wait for the leads to flood in. This again is wrong.

There is a balance that can be struck. And that’s where the idea of a Golden Ratio comes in. Get the ratio right, the theory goes, and you should have a consistent stream of leads due to a perfect mix of insight and marketing.

How it works

Let us say that you create six pieces of content during the week. When I say content I mean written posts, as well as infographics, videos and so on. Content marketing can mean any of these things, and variety is important.

Of those six pieces, four of them should be curated. This means you have searched and found interesting content that is relevant to your audience and their needs. It means you are providing value to your audience.

Just one of the pieces of content you create should be entirely created by you. This is the expertise part, and if it is done well, it will complement the four pieces of content you have curated.

The final piece of content should be completely sales related. This could be a press release about your company, or a sales letter, or a presentation. It could be a video about your product perhaps.

Why does this work? You’re pushing out leadership, through curated content and the content you have created yourself, but at the same time you’re also injecting a bit of sales into the mix. It’s the right balance, and it’s the Golden Ratio.

So that’s four pieces of curated content, one piece you made yourself, and one sales piece. That works out at 4:1:1 as a ratio. As a Golden Ratio, that is.

Scale it up by all means, but keep that Golden Ratio in mind, and you’ll soon gain content marketing traction.

How To Master Cold Calling Today

I have recently upped my telemarketing efforts, and it has been a particularly pleasing experience. I’ve found out a few truths about telemarketing, along with some cold calling techniques, that have now given me a strong focus on how to improve results and also improve my overall approach to marketing in general.

Last week I achieved two sales from probably five hours of telemarketing. I hesitate to call it telesales because I generally avoid the full sales approach. That is not to say that, as time goes on, I won’t see the value in employing people to literally sell heavily on the phones.

I spoke to someone this week and we both agreed the telephone as a sales and marketing instrument is far from dead. I am effectively using cold calling techniques when I pick up the phone to do what I do, but there are two clear benefits that make this cold calling attractive to me right now:

  • I can make contact with a large number of prospects, quickly
  • I can talk to them, which allows for real, personal communication

So I like cold calling, if we are going to call it that.

I’ve put together some tips and thoughts on cold calling techniques, stuff I’ve learned over the last few days. Already this is all becoming very apparent to me. Call it insight if you will. Whatever it is, all of the following is true.

Don’t go in hard with cold calling

This is the basis to good cold calling techniques. While you shouldn’t act like a wet blanket, your main aim should be to develop a conversation. Remember that cold calling is an automatic disruption of someone’s day. Be conversational and genuine. Don’t be a salesperson. They died out with the dinosaurs. Be a professional who wants to introduce a professional product or service.

Relax. What you do is amazing. It will find a buyer. So don’t sell it to death. Just talk about it and find your way to the sale naturally.

You will never be able to force a sale. So don’t try.

Use your voice as a cold calling weapon

Your voice is a precision tool. A weapon if you will. It should be part of your raft of successful cold calling techniques. Vary it’s tone and pitch. Slow it down and speed it up. Speak quietly now and then.

I met an accountant the other day who talked just like accountants are supposed to talk. Slow and monotonous. I know, obviously, that not all accountants talk in this way, but if they did they’d be the worst in the world at cold calling.

The prospect expects a loud, fake, formulaic, rushed torrent of insincerity. Change your voice regularly, make them pleasantly surprised.

Key point: 80% of the response a prospect gives is down to the voice you present with, not the words you use, which account for just 20%.

We will look at some other aspects of cold calling techniques soon. The practise is not dying, and people still like to talk.

So get on that phone and talk, professionally, about your amazing product or service. Someone out there is interested in what you do.

Go find them.